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Posts Tagged ‘slaves’

"Innocence Lost"  - Digital Art ©2008 WildGoddess

"Innocence Lost" - Digital Art ©2008 WildGoddess

I created this using an old vintage photo.  I am always taken by these boys piercing stare; they literally burn.  Should little boys even be this intense?  I guess if you were a slave, you would be, too!  Nevertheless, it remains one of my favorites.  It’s also for sale as a giclee print in my Etsy Shop.

"Omega" - 5" x7" watercolor ©2009 WildGoddess

"Omega" - 5" x7" watercolor ©2009 WildGoddess

Another watercolor from my sketchbook………….

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When I first saw Cedric Smith’s paintings, they left me breathless.  This highly creative Savannah artist and photographer creates works that are reminiscent of old, classic billboards and signs, yet they literally burst with political and sociological meaning and allegory.

Cedric Smith with one of his artworks

Cedric Smith with one of his artworks

You see, in my opinion, America’s past with it’s black citizens hasn’t yet been healed in the hearts of those whose ancestors suffered underneath the lash, and in the hearts of those unnamed persons who participated in slavery in either a positive or negative way.  And even within more recent times, there is a rich, rich gumbo of African-American history still waiting to be mined.  I sense there are so many untold, hidden stories yet to be told that we need to hear, so many unknown ancestors lost forever, so many unshed tears held in so long they’ve become concrete . . there is so much more to be uncovered and revealed to the light of day via the creative expressions of art, music, dance, and the printed word.

As an artist I long to participate, I open my heart as much as I can to hopefully catch just a wisp of my ancestors’ voices, whispering, whispering to me . .

"Kool Aid" - 48" x 36"  ©Cedric Smith

"Kool Aid" - 48" x 36" ©Cedric Smith

Yet I feel that Cedric Smith, in his own unique way, is doing that. He’s offering to every one of us an opportunity to re-discover a moment in time in African-American history – what it felt like, what it smelled like and, most importantly, what it meant to those disenfranchised individuals who lived during those times.  Go there.

 "Be", 36" x 36", mixed medium on canvas  ©Cedric Smith

"Be", 36" x 36", mixed medium on canvas ©Cedric Smith

I invite you to visit Cedric Smith’s website and check out all of his stunning artwork.  And then, think about your ancestors, how they lived, what they endured and what legacy they left you.  What can you add to their legacy – as an artist, as a person of this culture and this world?  What will your legacy be?

You can also visit Cedric Smith’s blog, “Vintage Blood” here.

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All photos, artwork and writing on the L’Artisana WildGoddess blog by WildGoddess are protected under copyright ©2003-2009 WildGoddess, and cannot be copied, distributed or reprinted without written permission from the artist.  If you would like to use something from this blog, contact WildGoddess to obtain her permission in advance.  Thank you for your consideration.

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Yes, I am always seeking those whispers that fade, yet somehow linger on the edges of consciousness . .

"Angie" - copyright ©2008 WildGoddess  “Angie” by WildGoddess 2008

Crawling out, out, out of a cave,

dripping-darkly with old dreams and faint memories that haunted me

draping themselves around my neck like an old, musty velvet stole

there is something addictive about this place; intriguing,

and I am so tempted to stay, but in this moment

there is something new,

something warm and comforting and golden and loving surrounding me

and i know it’s time to wake up

-WildGoddess


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All photos, artwork and writing on the L’Artisana WildGoddess blog by WildGoddess is protected under by copyright ©2003-2009 WildGoddess, and cannot be copied, distributed or reprinted without written permission from the artist.  If you would like to use something from this blog, contact me to obtain my permission in advance.  Thank you for your consideration.

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Yes He Can!

Oh, no, You Didn't! Oh, Yes he Did! (Photo: The Huffington Post)

This blog is not going to be only about politics, folks, but please bear with me for a while – these are important times that must be documented!

We now have a new President-Elect and First Lady – the brilliant, brilliant Barack Obama and his accomplished wife, Michelle. This is pure Destiny at work, and I, for one, am absolutely over-the-moon – not just for myself and all Americans, but also for all of my Black and Native American ancestors – glory, glory day!

Now we will see positive change come to our country, after decades of neglect.  Yes, glory days have now arrived in our society, and an Age of Humanism will replace the previous Age of Greed. (Of note: the name “Barack” means “one who is blessed” in Swahili…..)

Out of all of the moments during this history-making event, the one that moved me the most (not counting Mr. Obama’s inspiring acceptance speech in Grant Park), was when he and his wife visited the White House to meet with the Bushes.  I don’t know if you knew this, but slaves built the White House – every brick, stone and mortar. And now, two hundred and eight years after the fact (why did it take so long), a brilliant black man is climbing up those same stairs to enter it as the President-Elect.

I wonder what his thoughts were…..and then on top of that, Mrs. Obama wore screamin’ Red!  To the White House!  That color says so much to me – I remember when I was a child, my mother wouldn’t let us girls wear that color, because she said it made our skin look too dark (that was a long time ago, folks!)  Well, Michelle Obama certainly meant some serious business when she wore Red to the White House – You Go, Michelle! Wear It!

The Obamas at the White House - Nov. 10, 2008

The Obamas at the White House - Nov. 10, 2008

I never fully bought into the so-called “American Dream,” because sadly, I finally realized that it really was for the lucky or privileged few who either had a lot of discretionary income to play with, or were in the right place at the right time.  Many, many black Americans, like my parents, literally worked their fingers to the bone for themselves and their families for years and years, to no avail.

However, for the first time since Martin Luther King, there is Hope.  I find both Mr. and Mrs. Obama inspiring, because now I, and other Americans have an new ideal to look up to; a new dream to aspire to.  If they did it, then, really, just maybe, we can, too!

So I raise my glass to Barack Obama; I am behind him one hundred percent! (and Oprah, I thank you as well, for steppin’ up behind the brother like you did with your support!)

Camelot, 1963

The Kennedys at the "Camelot" White House, 1963 (AP Photo/FILE)

When you have a chance, go check out The Huffington Post – they’ve posted a great story called “Bamelot, A New Style For The White House” (A clever title – it’s a play on the Kennedys’ “Camelot White House.”)

p.s.  I promise to post some exciting new artwork soon – here.

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