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Posts Tagged ‘secret’

Liya - 12 x12 watercolor by WildGoddess ©2009

Liya - 12 x12 watercolor by WildGoddess ©2009

If you’re looking for the ” l’Artisana WildGoddess” blog, don’t worry, you’re in the right place. I’ve simply returned this blog to the original name of “The Secret WildGoddess.”  Why?  I like it better…….

I’ve been experimenting with watercolors as of late – it’s been a wonderful exercise in patience, patience, patience!  I guess you could say that working with watercolors could be a spiritual challenge to be met.  It gets away from you and runs around all over the place (like me), but I’ve learned that the effects are beautiful – even the mistakes.

"Tara" - 12" x 12" watercolor by WildGoddess ©2009

"Tara" - 12" x 12" watercolor by WildGoddess ©2009

Soon I’ll post some of my watercolors that I digitized in Photoshop – Wow! is all I can say!   Talk to you soon!

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I am always seeking those whispers that fade, yet somehow linger on the edges of consciousness . .
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All photos, artwork and writing on the L’Artisana WildGoddess blog by WildGoddess are protected under copyright ©2003-2009 WildGoddess, and cannot be copied, distributed or reprinted without written permission from the artist.  If you would like to use something from this blog, contact WildGoddess to obtain her permission in advance.  Thank you for your consideration.

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When I first saw Cedric Smith’s paintings, they left me breathless.  This highly creative Savannah artist and photographer creates works that are reminiscent of old, classic billboards and signs, yet they literally burst with political and sociological meaning and allegory.

Cedric Smith with one of his artworks

Cedric Smith with one of his artworks

You see, in my opinion, America’s past with it’s black citizens hasn’t yet been healed in the hearts of those whose ancestors suffered underneath the lash, and in the hearts of those unnamed persons who participated in slavery in either a positive or negative way.  And even within more recent times, there is a rich, rich gumbo of African-American history still waiting to be mined.  I sense there are so many untold, hidden stories yet to be told that we need to hear, so many unknown ancestors lost forever, so many unshed tears held in so long they’ve become concrete . . there is so much more to be uncovered and revealed to the light of day via the creative expressions of art, music, dance, and the printed word.

As an artist I long to participate, I open my heart as much as I can to hopefully catch just a wisp of my ancestors’ voices, whispering, whispering to me . .

"Kool Aid" - 48" x 36"  ©Cedric Smith

"Kool Aid" - 48" x 36" ©Cedric Smith

Yet I feel that Cedric Smith, in his own unique way, is doing that. He’s offering to every one of us an opportunity to re-discover a moment in time in African-American history – what it felt like, what it smelled like and, most importantly, what it meant to those disenfranchised individuals who lived during those times.  Go there.

 "Be", 36" x 36", mixed medium on canvas  ©Cedric Smith

"Be", 36" x 36", mixed medium on canvas ©Cedric Smith

I invite you to visit Cedric Smith’s website and check out all of his stunning artwork.  And then, think about your ancestors, how they lived, what they endured and what legacy they left you.  What can you add to their legacy – as an artist, as a person of this culture and this world?  What will your legacy be?

You can also visit Cedric Smith’s blog, “Vintage Blood” here.

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All photos, artwork and writing on the L’Artisana WildGoddess blog by WildGoddess are protected under copyright ©2003-2009 WildGoddess, and cannot be copied, distributed or reprinted without written permission from the artist.  If you would like to use something from this blog, contact WildGoddess to obtain her permission in advance.  Thank you for your consideration.

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"The Snoop" - ©2007 WildGoddess

"The Snoop" - ©2007 WildGoddess

A few evenings ago, I and my fellow sister-goddesses made a trek to Dockweiler Beach. Our plans were to settle around a firepit, light a big bonfire, and celebrate Mother Nature and the setting summer sun.

Unfortunately, things didn’t quite go as we had planned; by the time we arrived, all of the firepits were taken. Masking our disappointment, we settled down on the sand near a big, noisy family who were obviously having some sort of celebration. As we watched them, we noticed that even though they were surrounding a firepit, they weren’t actually using it. So, interrupting their celebration, I walked over and asked the group if we could use their firepit, also inviting them to feel free to enjoy our fire.

With generous smiles, they welcomed me and my girlfriends with open arms.

Even though this proposition was met with some reluctance on our part because we had actually come to the beach to listen to the sound of the surf (instead of Snoop Doggy Dog on a ghettoblaster!), we all decided to just trust the moment and roll with it. We came there to build a fire, so we moved our chairs over to the family’s firepit, and were instantaneously embraced by this family’s warm, generous heart.

Food and beverages were pressed upon us, teenagers came up and invited us “old folks” to dance to Snoop. Young children came over and sat with us, delighting in the warmth of our fire. Other family members brought us more wood to place upon the fire, and even felt free to chat with us about their lives. Before long, a neighboring Latino family offered food, too!

That summer evening turned out to be an absolute delight, and we eventually got our wish for peace, for as the sun began to set, our new friends packed up their things and headed home. Before long, we were finally able to listen to the sweet sound of the surf, the sound of our family’s goodbyes lingering on the air.

Because we live in Los Angeles, we’re constantly made aware of the so-called tension between blacks and Latinos in this city, but I have to say that during that warm summer night at Dockweiler Beach, all we experienced was love and an abiding sense of community. For that, I am very grateful.

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