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Posts Tagged ‘african-american’

"Innocence Lost"  - Digital Art ©2008 WildGoddess

"Innocence Lost" - Digital Art ©2008 WildGoddess

I created this using an old vintage photo.  I am always taken by these boys piercing stare; they literally burn.  Should little boys even be this intense?  I guess if you were a slave, you would be, too!  Nevertheless, it remains one of my favorites.  It’s also for sale as a giclee print in my Etsy Shop.

"Omega" - 5" x7" watercolor ©2009 WildGoddess

"Omega" - 5" x7" watercolor ©2009 WildGoddess

Another watercolor from my sketchbook………….

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When I first saw Cedric Smith’s paintings, they left me breathless.  This highly creative Savannah artist and photographer creates works that are reminiscent of old, classic billboards and signs, yet they literally burst with political and sociological meaning and allegory.

Cedric Smith with one of his artworks

Cedric Smith with one of his artworks

You see, in my opinion, America’s past with it’s black citizens hasn’t yet been healed in the hearts of those whose ancestors suffered underneath the lash, and in the hearts of those unnamed persons who participated in slavery in either a positive or negative way.  And even within more recent times, there is a rich, rich gumbo of African-American history still waiting to be mined.  I sense there are so many untold, hidden stories yet to be told that we need to hear, so many unknown ancestors lost forever, so many unshed tears held in so long they’ve become concrete . . there is so much more to be uncovered and revealed to the light of day via the creative expressions of art, music, dance, and the printed word.

As an artist I long to participate, I open my heart as much as I can to hopefully catch just a wisp of my ancestors’ voices, whispering, whispering to me . .

"Kool Aid" - 48" x 36"  ©Cedric Smith

"Kool Aid" - 48" x 36" ©Cedric Smith

Yet I feel that Cedric Smith, in his own unique way, is doing that. He’s offering to every one of us an opportunity to re-discover a moment in time in African-American history – what it felt like, what it smelled like and, most importantly, what it meant to those disenfranchised individuals who lived during those times.  Go there.

 "Be", 36" x 36", mixed medium on canvas  ©Cedric Smith

"Be", 36" x 36", mixed medium on canvas ©Cedric Smith

I invite you to visit Cedric Smith’s website and check out all of his stunning artwork.  And then, think about your ancestors, how they lived, what they endured and what legacy they left you.  What can you add to their legacy – as an artist, as a person of this culture and this world?  What will your legacy be?

You can also visit Cedric Smith’s blog, “Vintage Blood” here.

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All photos, artwork and writing on the L’Artisana WildGoddess blog by WildGoddess are protected under copyright ©2003-2009 WildGoddess, and cannot be copied, distributed or reprinted without written permission from the artist.  If you would like to use something from this blog, contact WildGoddess to obtain her permission in advance.  Thank you for your consideration.

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Sun Collage ©2007 WildGoddess

Sun Collage ©2007 WildGoddess

Here is another self-portrait I concocted in Adobe Photoshop.  I love how the colors came out so rich and vibrant.  It’s the sister to the self-portrait I showed a while ago.

I never know in advance what I’m going to create, be it digitally or by hand.  And if I were to go and try to recreate this piece again, well, I’m not so sure I could.  To get this type of look means playing around with layers in Photoshop for hours – basically, throwing the whole kitchen sink at the work, and whatever sticks, sticks!  That’s the magic of it all, isn’t it?

On another subject, Jeane Myers, a very gifted Pacific Northwest artist talked about creative inspiration on her blog, “Artit.”

Should an artist wait for inspiration to strike before creating?  I found the points she made very pertinent for our times – after all, can we as artists even afford to wait for inspiration to strike?

Take a look, check out her gorgeous artwork, and join in the conversation!

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I am always seeking those whispers that fade, yet somehow linger on the edges of consciousness . .

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All photos, artwork and writing on the L’Artisana WildGoddess blog by WildGoddess are protected under copyright ©2003-2009 WildGoddess, and cannot be copied, distributed or reprinted without written permission from the artist.  If you would like to use something from this blog, contact WildGoddess to obtain her permission in advance.  Thank you for your consideration.

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"Kristina" ©2008 WildGoddess

"Kristina" ©2008 WildGoddess

Above is an wonderful experiment of what happened when I tossed this imagery into the Adobe Illustrator pot, stirred it up with a whole bunch of text and colors until it began to boil, then poured the prepared “batter” into Adobe Photoshop, added some final “seasonings,” and let ‘er bake! (Seriously – the paper WAS baked in my oven with coffee grinds…)

Wild, isn’t it??

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All photos, artwork and texts on the L’Artisana WildGoddess blog by WildGoddess is protected under by copyright ©2003-2009 WildGoddess, and cannot be copied, distributed or reprinted without written permission from the artist.  If you would like to use something from this blog, please contact me to obtain my permission in advance.  Thank you for your consideration.

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. . I am always seeking those whispers that fade, yet somehow linger on the edges of consciousness . .

My main focus as an artist is creating Goddess art and commissioned Sacred Portraiture. After all, I believe that the Divine lives within each of us, and how wonderful it must be to be able to see an expression of that in an artwork!

"Ti-Leaf-Goddess"  by WildGoddess ©2009

"Ti-Leaf-Goddess" (unfinished) by WildGoddess ©2009

My Ti-Leaf Goddess painting (to the left) is the second in a series of sacred portraiture, and She is about one-third completed. I used primarily acrylic on illustration board and She is quite large. There’s still quite a ways to go, because I like to use a lot of texture, pattern and glitz in my paintings, which have yet to be added.

It’s hard to tell from this photo, but the birds have been stenciled on with texture paste, and they have a lot of relief pattern on their bodies. As a final touch, I plan to rub some metallic paint onto them, which will bring out the patterns beautifully (I hope!)

For the last few years, I’ve been primarily a digital artist, so it’s been a natural progression into wanting more of “the personal hand” in my artwork. The fun part is that I can now incorporate my digital art into my paintings and vice-versa. However, the Ti-Leaf Goddess is all painting (so far!)

Once She is finished, I will have Her photographed professionally, and sell giclee prints of Her at my Etsy Store. I may or may not add some digital elements to the prints first; we’ll see. Most of the time, when I do this, it’s to age and distress the work even further – I like that!

My reminder to myself while creating my art is to always deliberately focus my consciousness upon the task at hand, without judgment. I simply let go, and trust in the moment, allowing what needs to come out onto the canvas to do so. This allows for inspired effortlessness.

As far as I’m concerned, the day of the  poor “tortured artist” is ov-ah!   What do you think?

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Kara Walker, Artist

Kara Walker, Artist - digital art by WildGoddess ©2008


Kara Walker is a sometimes controversial artist who creates iconic, silhouetted figures, and projects them as full-scale wall installations. Her work evokes America’s dark involvement with slavery and the day-to-day experiences of those who suffered underneath the bitter lash.  Walker uses images from historical textbooks to depict African-American slaves in context of the Antebellum South. And because cut paper and silhouettes are becoming more and more popular among today’s artists, and as America embraces a black President, Walker’s work certainly takes on an even deeper resonance for our times.

Kara Walker, You Do, 1993-94. Cut Paper on canvas, 55 x 49 in. (140 x 124.5 cm). Collections of Peter Norton and Eileen Harris Norton. Photography courtesy the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York

Kara Walker, You Do, 1993-94. Cut Paper on canvas, 55 x 49 in. (140 x 124.5 cm). Collections of Peter Norton and Eileen Harris Norton. Photography courtesy the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York

Walker’s work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. A 1997 recipient of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Achievement Award, Walker was the United States representative to the 2002 São Paolo Bienal in Brazil.  She’s currently on the MFA faculty at Columbia University.

The PBS website, Art-21,  has a wonderfully comprehensive page on Kara Walker. You can also learn more about her here.

Kara Walker don’t play. Her artwork is innovative, stimulating and just a bit naughty, so if an opportunity ever presents itself to see her work in person, do so.

Below, she discusses one of her installations.

Note to whomever took the above photo: I would love to give credit where credit is due, so if it’s your photo I “decorated,” please let me know. Thanks!

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Yes, I am always seeking those whispers that fade, yet somehow linger on the edges of consciousness . .

"Angie" - copyright ©2008 WildGoddess  “Angie” by WildGoddess 2008

Crawling out, out, out of a cave,

dripping-darkly with old dreams and faint memories that haunted me

draping themselves around my neck like an old, musty velvet stole

there is something addictive about this place; intriguing,

and I am so tempted to stay, but in this moment

there is something new,

something warm and comforting and golden and loving surrounding me

and i know it’s time to wake up

-WildGoddess


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All photos, artwork and writing on the L’Artisana WildGoddess blog by WildGoddess is protected under by copyright ©2003-2009 WildGoddess, and cannot be copied, distributed or reprinted without written permission from the artist.  If you would like to use something from this blog, contact me to obtain my permission in advance.  Thank you for your consideration.

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